Lags in the response of mountain plant communities to climate change.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_BF4E32E3DBDF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Lags in the response of mountain plant communities to climate change.
Périodique
Global change biology
Auteur(s)
Alexander J.M., Chalmandrier L., Lenoir J., Burgess T.I., Essl F., Haider S., Kueffer C., McDougall K., Milbau A., Nuñez M.A., Pauchard A., Rabitsch W., Rew L.J., Sanders N.J., Pellissier L.
ISSN
1365-2486 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1354-1013
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
24
Numéro
2
Pages
563-579
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Rapid climatic changes and increasing human influence at high elevations around the world will have profound impacts on mountain biodiversity. However, forecasts from statistical models (e.g. species distribution models) rarely consider that plant community changes could substantially lag behind climatic changes, hindering our ability to make temporally realistic projections for the coming century. Indeed, the magnitudes of lags, and the relative importance of the different factors giving rise to them, remain poorly understood. We review evidence for three types of lag: "dispersal lags" affecting plant species' spread along elevational gradients, "establishment lags" following their arrival in recipient communities, and "extinction lags" of resident species. Variation in lags is explained by variation among species in physiological and demographic responses, by effects of altered biotic interactions, and by aspects of the physical environment. Of these, altered biotic interactions could contribute substantially to establishment and extinction lags, yet impacts of biotic interactions on range dynamics are poorly understood. We develop a mechanistic community model to illustrate how species turnover in future communities might lag behind simple expectations based on species' range shifts with unlimited dispersal. The model shows a combined contribution of altered biotic interactions and dispersal lags to plant community turnover along an elevational gradient following climate warming. Our review and simulation support the view that accounting for disequilibrium range dynamics will be essential for realistic forecasts of patterns of biodiversity under climate change, with implications for the conservation of mountain species and the ecosystem functions they provide.
Mots-clé
Altitude, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Plants/classification, alpine ecosystems, biotic interactions, climate change, climatic debt, migration, novel interactions, range dynamics, range expansion
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
19/02/2018 9:46
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:33
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