Testing for the dual-route cascade reading model in the brain: an fMRI effective connectivity account of an efficient reading style.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_BD4BB4663AB8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Testing for the dual-route cascade reading model in the brain: an fMRI effective connectivity account of an efficient reading style.
Périodique
Plos One
Auteur(s)
Levy J., Pernet C., Treserras S., Boulanouar K., Aubry F., Démonet J.F., Celsis P.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
4
Numéro
8
Pages
e6675
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: epublish
Résumé
Neuropsychological data about the forms of acquired reading impairment provide a strong basis for the theoretical framework of the dual-route cascade (DRC) model which is predictive of reading performance. However, lesions are often extensive and heterogeneous, thus making it difficult to establish precise functional anatomical correlates. Here, we provide a connective neural account in the aim of accommodating the main principles of the DRC framework and to make predictions on reading skill. We located prominent reading areas using fMRI and applied structural equation modeling to pinpoint distinct neural pathways. Functionality of regions together with neural network dissociations between words and pseudowords corroborate the existing neuroanatomical view on the DRC and provide a novel outlook on the sub-regions involved. In a similar vein, congruent (or incongruent) reliance of pathways, that is reliance on the word (or pseudoword) pathway during word reading and on the pseudoword (or word) pathway during pseudoword reading predicted good (or poor) reading performance as assessed by out-of-magnet reading tests. Finally, inter-individual analysis unraveled an efficient reading style mirroring pathway reliance as a function of the fingerprint of the stimulus to be read, suggesting an optimal pattern of cerebral information trafficking which leads to high reading performance.
Mots-clé
Brain/physiology, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods, Models, Biological, Neuropsychological Tests, Reading
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 20:20
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 0:32
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