Evolutionary patchwork of an insecticidal toxin shared between plant-associated pseudomonads and the insect pathogens Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Ruffner-BMCGenomics-2015-openaccess with supp.pdf (2169.74 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_BD1F089A09CB
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Evolutionary patchwork of an insecticidal toxin shared between plant-associated pseudomonads and the insect pathogens Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus.
Périodique
Bmc Genomics
Auteur(s)
Ruffner B., Péchy-Tarr M., Höfte M., Bloemberg G., Grunder J., Keel C., Maurhofer M.
ISSN
1471-2164 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1471-2164
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
16
Numéro
1
Pages
609
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Root-colonizing fluorescent pseudomonads are known for their excellent abilities to protect plants against soil-borne fungal pathogens. Some of these bacteria produce an insecticidal toxin (Fit) suggesting that they may exploit insect hosts as a secondary niche. However, the ecological relevance of insect toxicity and the mechanisms driving the evolution of toxin production remain puzzling.
RESULTS: Screening a large collection of plant-associated pseudomonads for insecticidal activity and presence of the Fit toxin revealed that Fit is highly indicative of insecticidal activity and predicts that Pseudomonas protegens and P. chlororaphis are exclusive Fit producers. A comparative evolutionary analysis of Fit toxin-producing Pseudomonas including the insect-pathogenic bacteria Photorhabdus and Xenorhadus, which produce the Fit related Mcf toxin, showed that fit genes are part of a dynamic genomic region with substantial presence/absence polymorphism and local variation in GC base composition. The patchy distribution and phylogenetic incongruence of fit genes indicate that the Fit cluster evolved via horizontal transfer, followed by functional integration of vertically transmitted genes, generating a unique Pseudomonas-specific insect toxin cluster.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that multiple independent evolutionary events led to formation of at least three versions of the Mcf/Fit toxin highlighting the dynamic nature of insect toxin evolution.
Mots-clé
Animals, Bacterial Toxins/genetics, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Insecticides/pharmacology, Insects/microbiology, Multigene Family, Photorhabdus/genetics, Photorhabdus/metabolism, Phylogeny, Plants/microbiology, Pseudomonas fluorescens/genetics, Pseudomonas fluorescens/metabolism, Xenorhabdus/genetics, Xenorhabdus/metabolism
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
07/07/2015 11:58
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:31
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