Early Secure Attachment as a Protective Factor Against Later Cognitive Decline and Dementia.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: fnagi-11-00161.pdf (846.53 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_BC9A2B6C7922
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Early Secure Attachment as a Protective Factor Against Later Cognitive Decline and Dementia.
Périodique
Frontiers in aging neuroscience
Auteur(s)
Walsh E., Blake Y., Donati A., Stoop R., von Gunten A.
ISSN
1663-4365 (Print)
ISSN-L
1663-4365
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
11
Pages
161
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
The etiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia is complex and incompletely understood. Interest in a developmental perspective to these pathologies is gaining momentum. An early supportive social environment seems to have important implications for social, affective and cognitive abilities across the lifespan. Attachment theory may help to explain the link between these early experiences and later outcomes. This theory considers early interactions between an infant and its caregiver to be crucial to shaping social behavior and emotion regulation strategies throughout adult life. Furthermore, research has demonstrated that such early attachment experiences can, potentially through epigenetic mechanisms, have profound neurobiological and cognitive consequences. Here we discuss how early attachment might influence the development of affective, cognitive, and neurobiological resources that could protect against cognitive decline and dementia. We argue that social relations, both early and late in life, are vital to ensuring cognitive and neurobiological health. The concepts of brain and cognitive reserve are crucial to understanding how environmental factors may impact cognitive decline. We examine the role that attachment might play in fostering brain and cognitive reserve in old age. Finally, we put forward the concept of affective reserve, to more directly frame the socio-affective consequences of early attachment as protectors against cognitive decline. We thereby aim to highlight that, in the study of aging, cognitive decline and dementia, it is crucial to consider the role of affective and social factors such as attachment.
Mots-clé
aging, attachment, cognitive decline, dementia, protective factor
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
02/08/2019 16:10
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:30
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