Fecundity and survival in relation to resistance to oxidative stress in a free-living bird.

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_BB3F1B58335F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Fecundity and survival in relation to resistance to oxidative stress in a free-living bird.
Périodique
Ecology
Auteur(s)
Bize P., Devevey G., Monaghan P., Doligez B., Christe P.
ISSN
0012-9658[print], 0012-9658[linking]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
89
Numéro
9
Pages
2584-2593
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Major life history traits, such as fecundity and survival, have been consistently demonstrated to covary positively in nature, some individuals having more resources than others to allocate to all aspects of their life history. Yet, little is known about which resources (or state variables) may account for such covariation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are natural by-products of metabolism and, when ROS production exceeds antioxidant defenses, organisms are exposed to oxidative stress that can have deleterious effects on their fecundity and survival. Using a wild, long-lived bird, the Alpine Swift (Apus melba), we examined whether individual red cell resistance to oxidative stress covaried with fecundity and survival. We found that males that survived to the next breeding season tended to be more resistant to oxidative stress, and females with higher resistance to oxidative stress laid larger clutches. Furthermore, the eggs of females with low resistance to oxidative stress were less likely to hatch than those of females with high resistance to oxidative stress. By swapping entire clutches at clutch completion, we then demonstrated that hatching failure was related to the production of low-quality eggs by females with low resistance to oxidative stress, rather than to inadequate parental care during incubation. Although male and female resistance to oxidative stress covaried with age, the relationships among oxidative stress, survival, and fecundity occurred independently of chronological age. Overall, our study suggests that oxidative stress may play a significant role in shaping fecundity and survival in the wild. It further suggests that the nature of the covariation between resistance to oxidative stress and life history traits is sex specific, high resistance to oxidative stress covarying primarily with fecundity in females and with survival in males.
Mots-clé
Animals, Fertility/physiology, Longevity/physiology, Oxidative Stress/physiology, Songbirds/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
01/09/2008 23:49
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:29
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