Antibodies to <i>Chlamydia trachomatis</i> and reproductive health issues in women with SLE: a case-control study.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_B997988DA92E
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Antibodies to <i>Chlamydia trachomatis</i> and reproductive health issues in women with SLE: a case-control study.
Périodique
Lupus science & medicine
Auteur(s)
Santos A., Greub G., Aeby S., Wunder D., Pantaleo G., Ribi C.
ISSN
2053-8790 (Print)
ISSN-L
2053-8790
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
5
Numéro
1
Pages
e000293
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
SLE is an autoimmune condition affecting predominantly women. Little is known regarding <i>Chlamydia trachomatis</i> infection in women with SLE, which may drive autoimmunity and contribute to obstetrical and vascular complications.
This single-centre, case-control study set primary endpoint in the comparative seropositivity rate to <i>C. trachomatis</i> major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and chlamydial heat-shock protein-60 (cHSP60) in age-matched subjects. The secondary endpoints were obstetrical outcomes, cardiovascular events and results from screening procedures for cervical cancer.
Eighty-four women with SLE and 50 age-matched controls were included. Seropositivity to <i>C. trachomatis</i> did not differ significantly between groups (10% of cases positive for anti-MOMP vs 12% of controls; 43% of cases positive for anti-cHSP60 vs 32% of controls). Women with SLE were more often of non-Caucasian ethnicity and had lower educational level. They relied less frequently on oral contraception and resorted more frequently to elective pregnancy termination. Pre-eclampsia and ectopic pregnancy occurred only in SLE. Women with SLE also experienced more cardiovascular events. In SLE, antibodies to cHSP60 were associated with a history of pericarditis and abnormal screening tests for cervical cancer. Antibody titres to <i>C. trachomatis</i> were not associated with disease activity or SLE treatment, nor were there associations with other gynaecological, obstetrical or vascular outcomes.
Prevalence of antibodies to <i>C. trachomatis</i> was not increased in women with SLE. No significant association was found between these antibodies and obstetrical or cardiovascular complications.
Mots-clé
i>, heat-shock protein 60, reproductive health, cardiovascular events, systemic lupus erythematosuschlamydia trachomatis
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/01/2019 15:41
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:27
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