The influence of social structure on brood survival and development in a socially polymorphic ant: insights from a cross-fostering experiment.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_B90E5BFB97F6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The influence of social structure on brood survival and development in a socially polymorphic ant: insights from a cross-fostering experiment.
Périodique
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Purcell J., Chapuisat M.
ISSN
1420-9101 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1010-061X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
25
Numéro
11
Pages
2288-2297
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Animal societies vary in the number of breeders per group, which affects many socially and ecologically relevant traits. In several social insect species, including our study species Formica selysi, the presence of either one or multiple reproducing females per colony is generally associated with differences in a suite of traits such as the body size of individuals. However, the proximate mechanisms and ontogenetic processes generating such differences between social structures are poorly known. Here, we cross-fostered eggs originating from single-queen (= monogynous) or multiple-queen (= polygynous) colonies into experimental groups of workers from each social structure to investigate whether differences in offspring survival, development time and body size are shaped by the genotype and/or prefoster maternal effects present in the eggs, or by the social origin of the rearing workers. Eggs produced by polygynous queens were more likely to survive to adulthood than eggs from monogynous queens, regardless of the social origin of the rearing workers. However, brood from monogynous queens grew faster than brood from polygynous queens. The social origin of the rearing workers influenced the probability of brood survival, with workers from monogynous colonies rearing more brood to adulthood than workers from polygynous colonies. The social origin of eggs or rearing workers had no significant effect on the head size of the resulting workers in our standardized laboratory conditions. Overall, the social backgrounds of the parents and of the rearing workers appear to shape distinct survival and developmental traits of ant brood.
Mots-clé
eusociality, Formica selysi, Hymenoptera, nature vs, nurture, queen number, social structure
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
31/07/2012 13:15
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:27
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