Blunt Trauma

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_B8161DEF45C2
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Titre
Blunt Trauma
Titre du livre
Atlas of Postmortem Angiography
Auteur(s)
Dedouit F., Mokrane FZ, Savall F., Faruch M., Grimm J., Grabherr S., Mangin P., Rousseau H., Rougé D., Telmon N.
Editeur
Springer International Publishing
ISBN
9783319285351
9783319285375
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Numéro de chapitre
26
Pages
345-409
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Blunt-force injuries are produced when the body is struck with or strikes a blunt object [1–5]. Both mechanisms result in a transfer of kinetic energy that is high enough to produce an injury. Blunt objects have a relatively large area. Examples of blunt objects are almost infinite: fists, shoes, pipes, bricks, bats, hammers, the ground, or parts of vehicles such as cars, trains, or airplanes. A blunt surface produces injuries by torsion, compression, scraping, tearing, shearing, or crushing. Blunt-force injuries occur in many kinds of medico-legal situations and contexts: criminal assaults, physical child abuse, traffic accidents, and falls (criminal, accidental, or suicidal). The severity of the injuries resulting from trauma is a balance between the amount of force, the area over which it is applied, and the duration of the force [2, 6]. In general, the greater the force, the smaller the area, or the shorter the duration over which the force is applied, the greater the injury will be.
Mots-clé
Blunt trauma Fractures Bones Viscus Motor vehicle accident Great height fall
Création de la notice
13/11/2017 16:00
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 20:48
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