Staphylococcus aureus host range and human-bovine host shift.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_B493BE5305DE
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Staphylococcus aureus host range and human-bovine host shift.
Périodique
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Auteur(s)
Sakwinska O., Giddey M., Moreillon M., Morisset D., Waldvogel A., Moreillon P.
ISSN
1098-5336 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0099-2240
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Volume
77
Numéro
17
Pages
5908-5915
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Staphylococcus aureus is a major agent of bovine mastitis. The concomitant emergence of pig-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in human carriage and infection requires a reexamination of the host range and specificity of human- and cow-associated S. aureus strains, something which has not been systematically studied previously. The genetic relatedness of 500 S. aureus isolates from bovine mastitis cases, 57 isolates from nasal carriage of farmers, and 133 isolates from nonfarmers was determined by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and spa typing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was conducted on a subset of isolates to match AFLP clusters with MLST clonal complexes (CCs). This data set allowed us to study host range and host specificity and to estimate the extent of bovine-to-human transmission. The genotype compositions of S. aureus isolates from farmers and nonfarmers were very similar, while the mastitis isolates were quite distinct. Overall, transmission was low, but specific genotypes did show increased cow-to-human transmission. Unexpectedly, more than one-third of mastitis isolates belonged to CC8, a lineage which has not been considered to be bovine mastitis associated, but it is well known from human carriage and infection (i.e., USA300). Despite the fact that we did detect some transmission of other genotypes from cows to farmers, no transmission of CC8 isolates to farmers was detected, except for one tentative case. This was despite the close genetic relatedness of mastitis CC8 strains to nonfarmer carriage strains. These results suggest that the emergence of the new bovine-adapted genotype was due to a recent host shift from humans to cows concurrent with a loss of the ability to colonize humans. More broadly, our results indicate that host specificity is a lineage-specific trait that can rapidly evolve.
Mots-clé
Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis, Animals, Carrier State/microbiology, Cattle/microbiology, Cluster Analysis, Host Specificity, Humans, Molecular Epidemiology, Multilocus Sequence Typing, Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology, Staphylococcal Infections/transmission, Staphylococcus aureus/classification, Staphylococcus aureus/genetics, Type="Geographic">United States, Zoonoses/microbiology, Zoonoses/transmission
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
06/12/2011 16:40
Dernière modification de la notice
09/05/2019 0:04
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