Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_B2D9D613A9A4
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study.
Périodique
British Journal of Psychiatry : the Journal of Mental Science
Auteur(s)
Hung C.F., Rivera M., Craddock N., Owen M.J., Gill M., Korszun A., Maier W., Mors O., Preisig M., Rice J.P., Rietschel M., Jones L., Middleton L., Aitchison K.J., Davis O.S., Breen G., Lewis C., Farmer A., McGuffin P.
ISSN
1472-1465 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0007-1250
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
205
Numéro
1
Pages
24-28
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Obesity has been shown to be associated with depression and it has been suggested that higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of depression and other common mental disorders. However, the causal relationship remains unclear and Mendelian randomisation, a form of instrumental variable analysis, has recently been employed to attempt to resolve this issue.
AIMS: To investigate whether higher BMI increases the risk of major depression.
METHOD: Two instrumental variable analyses were conducted to test the causal relationship between obesity and major depression in RADIANT, a large case-control study of major depression. We used a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in FTO and a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 32 SNPs with well-established associations with BMI.
RESULTS: Linear regression analysis, as expected, showed that individuals carrying more risk alleles of FTO or having higher score of GRS had a higher BMI. Probit regression suggested that higher BMI is associated with increased risk of major depression. However, our two instrumental variable analyses did not support a causal relationship between higher BMI and major depression (FTO genotype: coefficient -0.03, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.13, P = 0.73; GRS: coefficient -0.02, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.07, P = 0.62).
CONCLUSIONS: Our instrumental variable analyses did not support a causal relationship between higher BMI and major depression. The positive associations of higher BMI with major depression in probit regression analyses might be explained by reverse causality and/or residual confounding.
Mots-clé
Adult, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Depressive Disorder/etiology, Depressive Disorder/genetics, Female, Genotype, Humans, Male, Mendelian Randomization Analysis, Middle Aged, Obesity/complications, Obesity/genetics, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
30/10/2015 14:23
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:21
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