Airborne and grain dust fungal community compositions are shaped regionally by plant genotypes and farming practices

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_AEC27CE9D754
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Airborne and grain dust fungal community compositions are shaped regionally by plant genotypes and farming practices
Périodique
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Auteur(s)
Pellissier L., Oppliger Anne, Hirzel A.H., Savova-Bianchi Dessislava, Mbayo G., Mascher F., Kellenberger S., Niculita-Hirzel Hélène
ISSN
1098-5336 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0099-2240
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
29/01/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
82
Numéro
7
Pages
2121-2131
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Chronic exposure to airborne fungi has been associated with different respiratory symptoms and pathologies in occupational populations, such as grain workers. However, the homogeneity in the fungal species composition of these bioaerosols on a large geographical scale and the different drivers that shape these fungal communities remain unclear. In this study, the diversity of fungi in grain dust and in the aerosols released during harvesting was determined across 96 sites at a geographical scale of 560 km(2) along an elevation gradient of 500 m by tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. Associations between the structure of fungal communities in the grain dust and different abiotic (farming system, soil characteristics, and geographic and climatic parameters) and biotic (wheat cultivar and previous crop culture) factors were explored. These analyses revealed a strong relationship between the airborne and grain dust fungal communities and showed the presence of allergenic and mycotoxigenic species in most samples, which highlights the potential contribution of these fungal species to work-related respiratory symptoms of grain workers. The farming system was the major driver of the alpha and beta phylogenetic diversity values of fungal communities. In addition, elevation and soil CaCO3 concentrations shaped the alpha diversity, whereas wheat cultivar, cropping history, and the number of freezing days per year shaped the taxonomic beta diversity of these communities.
Mots-clé
Aerosols/analysis, Air Microbiology, Air Pollutants/analysis, Biodiversity, Dust/analysis, Edible Grain/microbiology, Fungi/classification, Fungi/genetics, Fungi/isolation & purification, Humans, Occupational Exposure, Phylogeny, Soil/chemistry
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
11/02/2016 17:15
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 23:44
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