Comparison of Sleep Disorders between Real and Simulated 3,450-m Altitude.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_AACF5DD8F5CB
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Comparison of Sleep Disorders between Real and Simulated 3,450-m Altitude.
Périodique
Sleep
Auteur(s)
Heinzer R., Saugy J.J., Rupp T., Tobback N., Faiss R., Bourdillon N., Rubio J.H., Millet G.P.
ISSN
1550-9109 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0161-8105
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/08/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
39
Numéro
8
Pages
1517-1523
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Hypoxia is known to generate sleep-disordered breathing but there is a debate about the pathophysiological responses to two different types of hypoxic exposure: normobaric hypoxia (NH) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH), which have never been directly compared. Our aim was to compare sleep disorders induced by these two types of altitude.
Subjects were exposed to 26 h of simulated (NH) or real altitude (HH) corresponding to 3,450 m and a control condition (NN) in a randomized order. The sleep assessments were performed with nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) and questionnaires. Thirteen healthy trained males subjects volunteered for this study (mean ± SD; age 34 ± 9 y, body weight 76.2 ± 6.8 kg, height 179.7 ± 4.2 cm).
Mean nocturnal oxygen saturation was further decreased during HH than in NH (81.2 ± 3.1 versus 83.6 ± 1.9%; P < 0.01) when compared to NN (95.5 ± 0.9%; P < 0.001). Heart rate was higher in HH than in NH (61 ± 10 versus 55 ± 6 bpm; P < 0.05) and NN (48 ± 5 bpm; P < 0.001). Total sleep time was longer in HH than in NH (351 ± 63 versus 317 ± 65 min, P < 0.05), and both were shorter compared to NN (388 ± 50 min, P < 0.05). Breathing frequency did not differ between conditions. Apnea-hypopnea index was higher in HH than in NH (20.5 [15.8-57.4] versus 11.4 [5.0-65.4]; P < 0.01) and NN (8.2 [3.9-8.8]; P < 0.001). Subjective sleep quality was similar between hypoxic conditions but lower than in NN.
Our results suggest that HH has a greater effect on nocturnal breathing and sleep structure than NH. In HH, we observed more periodic breathing, which might arise from the lower saturation due to hypobaria, but needs to be confirmed.

Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
01/10/2016 18:23
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:14
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