Influence of wakefulness on pharyngeal airway muscle activity

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_A6AA383F6CC0
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Influence of wakefulness on pharyngeal airway muscle activity
Périodique
Thorax
Auteur(s)
Lo  Y. L., Jordan  A. S., Malhotra  A., Wellman  A., Heinzer  R. A., Eikermann  M., Schory  K., Dover  L., White  D. P.
ISSN
0040-6376 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/2007
Volume
62
Numéro
9
Pages
799-805
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural --- Old month value: Sep
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Whether loss of wakefulness itself can influence pharyngeal dilator muscle activity and responsiveness is currently unknown. A study was therefore undertaken to assess the isolated impact of sleep on upper airway muscle activity after minimising respiratory/mechanical inputs. METHODS: Ten healthy subjects were studied. Genioglossus (GG), tensor palatini (TP) and diaphragm (DIA) electromyography (EMG), ventilation and sleep-wake status were recorded. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation was applied. Expiratory pressure was adjusted to yield the lowest GGEMG, thereby minimising airway negative pressure (mechanoreceptor) effects. Inspiratory pressure, respiratory rate and inspiratory time were adjusted until the subjects ceased spontaneous ventilation, thereby minimising central respiratory input. Muscle activity during wakefulness, wake-sleep transitions, stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were evaluated in the supine position. RESULTS: In transitions from wakefulness to sleep, significant decrements were observed in both mean GGEMG and TPEMG (1.6 (0.5)% to 1.3 (0.4)% of maximal GGEMG; 4.3 (2.3)% to 3.7 (2.1)% of maximal TPEMG). Compared with sleep onset, the activity of TP during stable NREM sleep and REM sleep was further decreased (3.7 (2.1)% vs 3.0 (2.0)% vs 3.0 (2.0)% of maximal EMG). However, GGEMG was only further reduced during REM sleep (1.3 (0.4)% vs 1.0 (0.3)% vs 1.1 (0.4)% of maximal EMG). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that wakefulness per se, independent of respiratory/mechanical stimuli, can influence pharyngeal dilator muscle activity.
Mots-clé
Adult Electromyography Female Humans Male Middle Aged Pharyngeal Muscles/*physiology Respiration Sleep/*physiology Wakefulness/*physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 10:45
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:11
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