Changes in leg spring behaviour, plantar loading and foot mobility magnitude induced by an exhaustive treadmill run in adolescent middle-distance runners.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_A424E455188D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Changes in leg spring behaviour, plantar loading and foot mobility magnitude induced by an exhaustive treadmill run in adolescent middle-distance runners.
Périodique
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Auteur(s)
Fourchet F., Girard O., Kelly L., Horobeanu C., Millet G.P.
ISSN
1878-1861 (Electronic)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
18
Numéro
2
Pages
199-203
Langue
anglais
Résumé
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine adjustments in spring-mass model characteristics, plantar loading and foot mobility induced by an exhaustive run.
DESIGN: Within-participants repeated measures.
METHODS: Eleven highly-trained adolescent middle-distance runners ran to exhaustion on a treadmill at a constant velocity corresponding to 95% of velocity associated with VO₂max (17.8 ± 1.4 kmh(-1), time to exhaustion=8.8 ± 3.4 min). Contact time obtained from plantar pressure sensors was used to estimate spring-mass model characteristics, which were recorded (during 30 s) 1 min after the start and prior to exhaustion using pressure insoles. Foot mobility magnitude (a composite measure of vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot) was measured before and after the run.
RESULTS: Mean contact area (foot to ground), contact time, peak vertical ground reaction force, centre of mass vertical displacement and leg compression increased significantly with fatigue, while flight time, leg stiffness and mean pressure decreased. Leg stiffness decreased because leg compression increased to a larger extent than peak vertical ground reaction forces. Step length, step frequency and foot mobility magnitude did not change at exhaustion.
CONCLUSIONS: The stride pattern of adolescents when running on a treadmill at high constant velocity deteriorates near exhaustion, as evidenced by impaired leg-spring behaviour (leg stiffness) and altered plantar loading.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
05/03/2014 9:27
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 20:13
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