Auditory evoked potential patterns to voiced and voiceless speech sounds in adult developmental dyslexics with persistent deficits.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_A3F8D78FC977
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Auditory evoked potential patterns to voiced and voiceless speech sounds in adult developmental dyslexics with persistent deficits.
Périodique
Cerebral Cortex
Auteur(s)
Giraud K., Démonet J.F., Habib M., Marquis P., Chauvel P., Liégeois-Chauvel C.
ISSN
1047-3211 (Print)
ISSN-L
1047-3211
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2005
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
15
Numéro
10
Pages
1524-1534
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded from eight developmental dyslexic adults with persistent reading, spelling and phonological deficits, and 10 non-dyslexic controls to voiced (/ba/) and voiceless (/pa/) consonant-vowel syllables. Consistent with previous data, non-dyslexics coded these stimuli differentially according to the temporal cues that form the basis of the voiced/voiceless contrast: AEPs had time-locked components with latencies that were determined by the temporal structure of the stimuli. Dyslexics were characterized by one of two electrophysiological patterns: AEP pattern I dyslexics demonstrated a differential coding of stimuli on the basis of some temporal cues, but with an atypically large number of components and a considerable delay in AEP termination time; AEP pattern II dyslexics demonstrated no clear differential coding of stimuli on the basis of temporal cues. These data reveal the presence of anomalies in cortical auditory processing which could underlie persistent perceptual and linguistic impairments in some developmental dyslexics. Furthermore, scalp AEP distribution maps showing the difference observed between /ba/ and /pa/ activity over time suggest that the regions implicated in the processing of crucial time-related acoustic cues were not systematically lateralized to the left hemisphere like they were for non-dyslexics. These findings may be conducive to a better understanding and treatment of perceptual dysfunctions in developmental language disorders.
Mots-clé
Acoustic Stimulation, Adult, Aging/physiology, Aging/psychology, Brain Mapping, Cues, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Discrimination (Psychology)/physiology, Dyslexia/physiopathology, Dyslexia/psychology, Electroencephalography, Electrophysiology, Evoked Potentials, Auditory/physiology, Female, Functional Laterality/physiology, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Speech Perception/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 19:44
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:09
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