Pain and beliefs after musuloskeletal trauma: Complex relationships during the first year of rehabilitation

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_A1B97737EA7B
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Abstract (résumé de présentation): article court qui reprend les éléments essentiels présentés à l'occasion d'une conférence scientifique dans un poster ou lors d'une intervention orale.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Pain and beliefs after musuloskeletal trauma: Complex relationships during the first year of rehabilitation
Titre de la conférence
SOFMER 2011, 26e congrès de la Société Française de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation
Auteur(s)
Favre C., Ballabeni P., Deriaz O., Luthi F.
Adresse
Nantes, France, 13-15 octobre 2011
ISBN
1877-0657
ISSN-L
1877-0657
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Volume
54
Série
Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Pages
e41-e42
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Introduction.- Pain and beliefs have an influence on the patient's course in rehabilitation and their relationships are complex. The aim of this study was to understand the relationships between pain at admission and the evolution of beliefs during rehabilitation as well as the relationships between pain and beliefs one year after rehabilitation.Patients and methods.- Six hundred and thirty-one consecutive patients admitted in rehabilitation after musculoskeletal trauma, were included and assessed at admission, at discharge and one year after discharge. Pain was measured by VAS (Visual Analogical Scale) and beliefs by judgement on Lickert scales. Four kinds of beliefs were evaluated: fear of a severe origin of pain, fear of movement, fear of pain and feeling of distress (loss of control). The association between pain and beliefs was assessed by logistic regressions, adjusted for gender, age, native language, education and bio-psycho-social complexity.Results.- At discharge, 44% of patients felt less distressed by pain, 34% are reinsured with regard to their fear of a severe origin of pain, 38% have less fear of pain and 33% have less fear of movement. The higher the pain at admission, the higher the probability that the distress diminished, this being true up to a threshold (70 mm/100) beyond which there was a plateau. At one year, the higher the pain, the more dysfunctional the fears.Discussion.- The relationships between pain and beliefs are complex and may change all along rehabilitation. During hospitalization, one could hope that the patient would be reinsured and would gain self-control again, if pain does not exceed a certain threshold. After one year, high pain increases the risk of dysfunctional beliefs. For clinical practice, these data suggest to think in terms of the more accessible "entrance door", act against pain and/or against beliefs, adpated to each patient.
Création de la notice
15/02/2012 15:43
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 20:08
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