Inter-informant agreement on diagnoses and prevalence estimates of anxiety disorders: direct interview versus family history method.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_9FD8FA866F8F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Inter-informant agreement on diagnoses and prevalence estimates of anxiety disorders: direct interview versus family history method.
Périodique
Psychiatry research
Auteur(s)
Rougemont-Buecking A., Rothen S., Jeanprêtre N., Lustenberger Y., Vandeleur C.L., Ferrero F., Preisig M.
ISSN
0165-1781 (Print)
ISSN-L
0165-1781
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
15/01/2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
157
Numéro
1-3
Pages
211-223
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The aims of the present study were to: (1) assess agreement for diagnoses of specific anxiety disorders between direct interviews and the family history method; (2) compare prevalence estimates according to direct interviews and family history information; (3) test strategies to approximate prevalence estimates according to family history reports to those based on direct interviews; (4) test covariates of inter-informant agreement; and (5) test the likelihood of reporting disorders by informants. Analyses were based on family study data which included 1625 distinct informant (first-degree relatives and spouses)-index subject pairs. Our main findings were: (1) inter-informant agreement was satisfactory for panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder; (2) the family history method provided lower prevalence estimates for all anxiety disorders (except for generalized anxiety disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder) than direct interviews; (3) the lowering of diagnostic thresholds and the combination of multiple family history reports increased the accuracy of prevalence estimates according to the family history method; (4) female gender of index subjects was associated with poor agreement; and (5) informants, who themselves had a history of an anxiety disorder, were more likely to detect this disorder in their relatives which entails the risk of overestimation of the size of familial aggregation.

Mots-clé
Adult, Algorithms, Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis, Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology, Anxiety Disorders/genetics, Female, Humans, Male, Medical History Taking, Mental Disorders/diagnosis, Mental Disorders/epidemiology, Mental Disorders/genetics, Observer Variation, Prevalence
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
13/03/2008 8:39
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:06
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