Right hemisphere activation in recovery from aphasia: lesion effect or function recruitment?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_9F8BD227FAC6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Right hemisphere activation in recovery from aphasia: lesion effect or function recruitment?
Périodique
Neurology
Auteur(s)
Raboyeau G., De Boissezon X., Marie N., Balduyck S., Puel M., Bézy C., Démonet J.F., Cardebat D.
ISSN
1526-632X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0028-3878
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
70
Numéro
4
Pages
290-298
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Some neuroimaging studies have suggested that specific right hemispheric regions can compensate deficits induced by left hemispheric lesions in vascular aphasia. In particular, the right inferior frontal cortex might take part in lexical retrieval in patients presenting left-sided lesions involving the homologous area.
OBJECTIVE: To address whether the involvement of the right inferior frontal cortex is either unique to recovering aphasic patients or present also in other circumstances of enrichment of lexical abilities, i.e., in non-brain-damaged subjects over learning of new vocabulary.
METHODS: Ten post-stroke aphasic patients experiencing word finding difficulties were intensively trained to retrieve object names in French over a 4-week period. Twenty healthy subjects were similarly trained to name these items in either Spanish or English, i.e., foreign languages that they learned at school but did not master. By analogy to aphasic patients, healthy subjects had to work out the phonetic/phonologic representations of long-acquired but forgotten words. Brain activity changes were assessed in two H(2)(15)O PET sessions involving picture naming tasks that were performed before and after training.
RESULTS: Comparable post-training performance and changes in regional cerebral blood flow including mainly the right insular and inferior frontal regions were found in both groups.
CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that enhanced activities in right-sided areas observed in recovering aphasia is not the mere consequence of damage to left-sided homologous areas and could reflect the neural correlates of lexical learning also observed in control subjects.
Mots-clé
Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aphasia/physiopathology, Aphasia/radionuclide imaging, Brain Mapping, Cerebral Infarction/complications, Cerebral Infarction/physiopathology, Cerebrovascular Circulation/physiology, Dominance, Cerebral/physiology, Female, Frontal Lobe/anatomy & histology, Frontal Lobe/physiology, Humans, Language Tests, Language Therapy, Learning/physiology, Male, Middle Aged, Neuronal Plasticity/physiology, Positron-Emission Tomography, Reading, Recovery of Function/physiology, Recruitment, Neurophysiological/physiology, Speech/physiology, Treatment Outcome, Verbal Behavior/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 20:00
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 20:03
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