Use it or lose it! Cognitive activity as a protec-tive factor for cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 14407.pdf (418.44 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_9F2EAAAF3926
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Use it or lose it! Cognitive activity as a protec-tive factor for cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease.
Périodique
Swiss medical weekly
Auteur(s)
Mistridis P., Mata J., Neuner-Jehle S., Annoni J.M., Biedermann A., Bopp-Kistler I., Brand D., Brioschi Guevara A., Decrey-Wick H., Démonet J.F., Hemmeter U., Kressig R.W., Martin B., Rampa L., Savaskan E., Stuck A., Tschopp P., Zekry D., Monsch A.
ISSN
1424-3997 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0036-7672
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
21/03/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
147
Pages
w14407
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Because of the worldwide aging of populations, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias constitute a devastating experience for patients and families as well as a major social and economic burden for both healthcare systems and society. Multiple potentially modifiable cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors have been associated with this disease. Thus, modifying these risk factors and identifying protective factors represent important strategies to prevent and delay disease onset and to decrease the social burden. Based on the cognitive reserve hypothesis, evidence from epidemiological studies shows that low education and cognitive inactivity constitute major risk factors for dementia. This indicates that a cognitively active lifestyle may protect against cognitive decline or delay the onset of dementia. We describe a newly developed preventive programme, based on this evidence, to stimulate and increase cognitive activity in older adults at risk for cognitive decline. This programme, called "BrainCoach", includes the technique of "motivational interviewing" to foster behaviour change. If the planned feasibility study is successful, we propose to add BrainCoach as a module to the already existing "Health Coaching" programme, a Swiss preventive programme to address multiple risk factors in primary care.

Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
17/04/2017 17:49
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:05
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