Mental Health Symptoms and Work-Related Stressors in Hospital Midwives and NICU Nurses: A Mixed Methods Study.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Favrod_Frontiers2018.pdf (636.80 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_9C1018FBA295
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Mental Health Symptoms and Work-Related Stressors in Hospital Midwives and NICU Nurses: A Mixed Methods Study.
Périodique
Frontiers in psychiatry
Auteur(s)
Favrod C., Jan du Chêne L., Martin Soelch C., Garthus-Niegel S., Tolsa J.F., Legault F., Briet V., Horsch A.
ISSN
1664-0640 (Print)
ISSN-L
1664-0640
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Pages
364
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Hospital midwives and neonatal intensive care (NICU) nurses frequently encounter work-related stressors and are therefore vulnerable to developing mental health problems, such as secondary traumatic stress, burnout, anxiety, and depression. However, so far, the exact nature of these work-related stressors (traumatic vs. non-traumatic stressors) has not been investigated. This concurrent triangulation mixed methods cross-sectional study aimed to compare mental health symptoms in hospital midwives and NICU nurses, and to identify and compare work-related traumatic and non-traumatic stressors for both professional groups. 122 midwives and 91 NICU nurses of two Swiss university hospitals completed quantitative measures (Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale, STSS; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS; Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI) and one qualitative question in an online survey. When controlling for socio-demographic variables, NICU nurses had a higher STSS total score and higher STSS subscales scores and less HADS anxiety subscale scores than hospital midwives. Work-related stressors were classified into five themes: "Working environment," "Nursing/midwifery care," "Dealing with death and dying," "Case management" and "Others." Forty-six (46.3%) percent of these were classified as traumatic work-related stressors. NICU nurses reported more traumatic stressors in their working environment but no other differences between professional groups regarding the total number of work-related traumatic vs. non-traumatic stressors were found. Measures, such as teaching strategies to amend the subjective appraisal of the traumatic stressors or providing time to recover in-between frequently occurring work-related traumatic stressors might not only improve the mental health of professionals but also decrease sick leave and improve the quality of patient care.
Mots-clé
Psychiatry and Mental health, anxiety, burnout, depression, midwives, nurses, professional, secondary traumatic stress, stressor
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
20/08/2018 21:32
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:02
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