A systematic review of passive exposure to cannabis

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 2016_Berthet_Systematic_ForensicSciInt_postprint.pdf (1472.19 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_9AE321EEB852
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
A systematic review of passive exposure to cannabis
Périodique
Forensic Science International
Auteur(s)
Berthet Aurélie, De Cesare Mariangela, Favrat Bernard, Sporkert Frank, Augsburger Marc, Thomas Aurélien, Giroud Christian
ISSN
1872-6283 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0379-0738
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
269
Pages
97-112
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Passive exposure to cannabis smoke may induce effects on behavior and psychomotor skills, and have legal consequences, including the risk of being falsely considered as a cannabis user. This can become a concern, especially in occupational contexts or when driving vehicles. In order to enable a differentiation between a passive and an active exposure to cannabis and to limit the likeliness to be detected positive following passive exposure, this review identified specific biomarkers of passive exposure in urine, blood, oral fluid, hair, and sebum. Out of 958 papers identified on passive exposure to cannabis, 21 were selected. Although positive tests had been observed in all matrices following extremely high passive exposure, some distinctive features were observed in each matrix compared to cannabis active use. More specifically, in everyday life conditions, 11-nor-delta-9-THC-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) urinary level should be detected below the positivity threshold used to confirm active smoking of cannabis, especially after normalization to creatinine level. Measuring delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and THC-COOH in blood is an appropriate alternative for appraising passive exposure as low and very low concentrations of THC and THC-COOH, respectively, should be measured. In hair, oral fluid (OF) and sweat/sebum emulsion, no THCCOOH should be detected. Its presence in hair argues for regular cannabis consumption and in OF or sweat for recent consumption. The experts should recommend to persons who have to demonstrate abstinence from cannabis to avoid heavily smoky and unventilated environments.

Mots-clé
Biomarkers/analysis, Dronabinol/analogs & derivatives, Dronabinol/analysis, Hair/chemistry, Humans, Marijuana Smoking, Saliva/chemistry, Sweat/chemistry, Tobacco Smoke Pollution, Blood, Cannabis, Hair, Oral fluid, Passive exposure, Urine
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
25/11/2016 13:52
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:02
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