Supplemental parenteral nutrition improves immunity with unchanged carbohydrate and protein metabolism in critically ill patients: The SPN2 randomized tracer study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_992C9C7060CA
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Supplemental parenteral nutrition improves immunity with unchanged carbohydrate and protein metabolism in critically ill patients: The SPN2 randomized tracer study.
Périodique
Clinical nutrition
Auteur(s)
Berger M.M., Pantet O., Jacquelin-Ravel N., Charrière M., Schmidt S., Becce F., Audran R., Spertini F., Tappy L., Pichard C.
ISSN
1532-1983 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0261-5614
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/11/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Résumé
Individualized supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) providing measured energy expenditure from day 4 reduced infectious complications in a previous study including 305 intensive care (ICU) patients. The study aimed at investigating the metabolic, and immune responses underlying the clinical response of the previous trial.
Randomized controlled trial enrolling 23 critically ill patients on day 3 (D3) of admission to the ICU who were fed less than 60% of their energy target by the enteral nutrition (EN) alone: allocation to either continued EN or to SPN to a target validated by indirect calorimetry. Protein and glucose metabolism (primary endpoint) were investigated with tracer isotopes on D4 and D9. Secondary endpoints: 1) immune response, investigated in serum and in stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBC), by dosing a panel of cytokines (infectious complications were recorded), and 2) Muscle mass was assessed by ultrasound of the thigh.
Comparable at baseline, the SPN group (n = 11) received more energy (median 24.3 versus 17.8 kcal/kg/day: p < 0.001) and proteins (1.11 versus 0.69 g/kg/day: p < 0.001) than the control group during the five days' intervention, resulting in a less negative energy balance by D9 (p = 0.0027). Net protein breakdown and Glucose kinetics on D9 did not differ, within or between groups. In agreement with a decrease in infection rate, immune response in the SPN group showed decreased serum IL-6 (p = 0.024), IL-1β, IL-10 levels and TNF-α secretion by PBMC (p = 0.018) at D9. Muscle mass loss from D4 to D15 tended to be less in the SPN group (-16% versus -23%: p = 0.06). Clinical course by D28 did not differ.
Feeding patients to cover an individualised measured energy target with SPN from D4 to cover needs, was associated with improved immunity, less systemic inflammation and a trend to less muscle mass loss.
NCT02022813 at https://clinicaltrials.gov/.
Mots-clé
Critical illness, Glucose kinetics, Immune response, Infection, Muscle mass, Protein turnover
Pubmed
Création de la notice
26/11/2018 15:05
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 6:34
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