Transition of care: A set of pharmaceutical interventions improves hospital discharge prescriptions from an internal medicine ward

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_960EB61C3714
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Transition of care: A set of pharmaceutical interventions improves hospital discharge prescriptions from an internal medicine ward
Périodique
European journal of internal medicine
Auteur(s)
Neeman M., Dobrinas M., Maurer S., Tagan D., Sautebin A., Blanc A.L., Widmer N.
ISSN
1879-0828 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0953-6205
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
38
Pages
30-37
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article

Résumé
Continuity of care between hospitals and community pharmacies needs to be improved to ensure medication safety. This study aimed to evaluate whether a set of pharmaceutical interventions to prepare hospital discharge facilitates the transition of care.
This study took place in the internal medicine ward and in surrounding community pharmacies. The intervention group's patients underwent a set of pharmaceutical interventions during their hospital stay: medication reconciliation at admission, medication review, and discharge planning. The two groups were compared with regards to: number of community pharmacist interventions, time spent on discharge prescriptions, and number of treatment changes.
Comparison between the groups showed a much lower (77% lower) number of community pharmacist interventions per discharge prescription in the intervention (n=54 patients) compared to the control group (n=64 patients): 6.9 versus 1.6 interventions, respectively (p<0.0001); less time working on discharge prescriptions; less interventions requiring a telephone call to a hospital physician. The number of medication changes at different steps was also significantly lower in the intervention group: 40% fewer (p<0.0001) changes between hospital admission and discharge, 66% fewer (p<0.0001) between hospital discharge and community pharmacy care, and 25% fewer (p=0.002) between community pharmacy care and care by a general practitioner.
An intervention group underwent significantly fewer medication changes in subsequent steps in the transition of care after a set of interventions performed during their hospital stay. Community pharmacists had to perform fewer interventions on discharge prescriptions. Altogether, this improves continuity of care.

Mots-clé
Clinical pharmacist, Community pharmacy, Discharge planning, Hospital discharge prescription, Medication reconciliation, Transition of care
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
04/11/2016 22:16
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:58
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