Alien Plant Species: Environmental Risks in Agricultural and Agro-Forest Landscapes Under Climate Change

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_94A9BA4AF7D2
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Titre
Alien Plant Species: Environmental Risks in Agricultural and Agro-Forest Landscapes Under Climate Change
Titre du livre
Climate Change-Resilient Agriculture and Agroforestry
Auteur(s)
Vicente J.R., Vaz A.S., Queiroz A.I., Buchadas A.R., Guisan A., Kueffer C., Marchante E., Marchante H., Cabral J.A., Nesper M., Broennimann O., Godoy O., Alves P., Castro-Díez P., Renato H., Honrado J.P.
Editeur
Springer
Lieu d'édition
Cham
ISBN
978-3-319-75004-0
Statut éditorial
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Editeur scientifique
Castro P., Azul A., Leal Filho W., Azeiteiro U.
Série
Climate Change Management
Pages
215-234
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Alien plant species have been essential for farming and agro-forestry
systems and for their supply of food, fiber, tannins, resins or wood from antiquity to
the present. They also contributed to supporting functions and regulating services
(water, soil, biodiversity) and to the design of landscapes with high cultural and
scenic value. Some of those species were intentionally introduced, others arrived
accidentally, and a small proportion escaped, naturalized and became invasive in
natural ecosystems—these are known as invasive alien species (IAS). Here, invasive means that these species have some significant negative impact, either by
spreading from human-controlled environments (e.g. fields, gardens) to natural
ecosystems, where they can cause problems to native species, or to other production
systems or urban areas, impacting on agricultural, forestry activities or human
health. Socio-environmental impacts associated with plant invasions have been
increasingly recognized worldwide and are expected to increase considerably under
changing climate or land use. Early detection tools are key to anticipate IAS and to
prevent and control their impacts. In this chapter, we focus on crop and non-crop
alien plant species for which there is evidence or prediction of invasive behaviour
and impacts. We provide insights on their history, patterns, risks, early detection,
forecasting and management under climate change. Specifically, we start by providing
a general overview on the history of alien plant species in agricultural and
agroforestry systems worldwide (Sect. 1). Then, we assess patterns, risks and
impacts resulting from alien plants originally cultivated and that became invasive
outside cultivation areas (Sect. 2). Afterwards, we provide several considerations
for managing the spread of invasive plant species in the landscape (Sect. 3). Finally,
we discuss challenges of alien plant invasions for agricultural and agroforest systems,
in the light of climate change (Sect. 4).
Mots-clé
Ecosystem service, Impact assessment, Introduction history, Plant invasions, Predictive modelling, Remote sensing
Site de l'éditeur
Création de la notice
06/02/2019 17:38
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 5:32
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