YOUNGER AGE AT PRESENTATION IN CHILDREN WITH COATS DISEASE IS ASSOCIATED WITH MORE ADVANCED STAGE AND WORSE VISUAL PROGNOSIS: A Retrospective Study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_93DE7FB0572B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
YOUNGER AGE AT PRESENTATION IN CHILDREN WITH COATS DISEASE IS ASSOCIATED WITH MORE ADVANCED STAGE AND WORSE VISUAL PROGNOSIS: A Retrospective Study.
Périodique
Retina
Auteur(s)
Daruich A., Matet A., Munier F.L.
ISSN
1539-2864 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0275-004X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
11/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
38
Numéro
11
Pages
2239-2246
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To determine the age distribution of children with Coats disease and the impact of age at diagnosis on the visual prognosis.
Consecutive Coats disease cases aged 18 years or younger at diagnosis were retrospectively included. Clinical and imaging parameters were analyzed by comparative, correlation, survival, univariate, and multivariate statistics.
Ninety-eight patients were included. At diagnosis, mean age was 5.4 years ± 4.3 years (1 month-18 years). Younger age at diagnosis was correlated with more severe disease stage (P < 0.0001, r = -0.52), which was confirmed by survival analysis (P < 0.0001). Comparative analysis was performed between patients younger and older than 4 years at diagnosis. Leukocoria or strabismus was more frequent at presentation in patients younger than 4 years (P < 0.0001). Areas of peripheral nonperfusion and peripheral telangiectasia were more extensive at presentation in younger than older patients (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.039). Foveal sparing at diagnosis was less frequent in younger than older patients (2% vs. 23%, P = 0.002). The incidence of structural complications or enucleation during follow-up (mean duration: 5.9 years ± 4.5 years) was higher, and last-recorded visual acuity was lower in younger than older patients (P = 0.001 and P = 0.0009). Final logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution visual acuity was negatively correlated with age at diagnosis (P = 0.001, Spearman r = -0.42). Multivariate analysis indicated that disease stage (P < 0.0001), but not age at diagnosis (P = 0.07), independently influenced the last-recorded visual acuity.
Onset of Coats disease in children of younger age is associated with more severe manifestations, more advanced stage, and worse visual outcome. Age, correlated with disease stage, should be considered a prognostic marker in Coats disease.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Age Distribution, Age Factors, Child, Child, Preschool, Disease Progression, Female, Fluorescein Angiography/methods, Follow-Up Studies, Fovea Centralis/pathology, Fundus Oculi, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Prognosis, Retinal Telangiectasis/diagnosis, Retinal Telangiectasis/epidemiology, Retinal Telangiectasis/physiopathology, Retrospective Studies, Switzerland/epidemiology, Visual Acuity/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
30/10/2017 10:40
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:56
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