Contribution of ultrasonographic examination to the prenatal detection of trisomy 21: experience from 19 European registers.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_92F0D8EB3233
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Contribution of ultrasonographic examination to the prenatal detection of trisomy 21: experience from 19 European registers.
Périodique
Annales de Génétique
Auteur(s)
Wellesley D., De Vigan C., Baena N., Cariati E., Stoll C., Boyd P.A., Clementi M.
Collaborateur(s)
EUROSCAN Study Group
ISSN
0003-3995
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2004
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
47
Numéro
4
Pages
373-380
Langue
anglais
Notes
(Addor M.C. included in the EUROSCAN Group)
Résumé
The objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of ultrasound scanning to the prenatal detection of trisomy 21 in a large unselected European population. Data from 19 congenital malformation registers in 11 European countries were included. The prenatal ultrasound screening programs in the countries ranged from no routine screening to three ultrasound investigations per patient. Routine serum screening was offered in four of the 11 countries and routine screening on the basis of maternal age amniocentesis in all. The results show that overall 53% of cases of trisomy 21 were detected prenatally with a range from 3% in Lithuania to 88% in Paris. Ninety-eight percent of women whose babies were diagnosed before 24 weeks gestation chose to terminate the pregnancy. Centres/countries that offer serum screening do not have a significantly higher detection rate of trisomy 21 when compared to those that offer maternal age amniocentesis and anomaly scanning only. Fifty percent of trisomy 21 cases were born to women aged 35 years or more. In conclusions, second trimester ultrasound plays an important role in the prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21. Of those cases prenatally diagnosed, 64% of cases in women <35 years and 36% of those in women >or=35 years were detected because of an ultrasound finding. Ultrasound soft markers accounted for 84% of the scan diagnoses. There is evidence of increasing maternal age across Europe with 50% of cases of trisomy 21 born to women aged 35 years or more.
Mots-clé
Down Syndrome, Europe, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Mass Screening, Maternal Age, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Outcome, Registries, Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
31/03/2009 12:25
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:33
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