Agricultural land use and human presence around breeding sites increase stress-hormone levels and decrease body mass in barn owl nestlings.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_924ACAAB73E9.P001.pdf (531.67 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_924ACAAB73E9
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Agricultural land use and human presence around breeding sites increase stress-hormone levels and decrease body mass in barn owl nestlings.
Périodique
Oecologia
Auteur(s)
Almasi B., Béziers P., Roulin A., Jenni L.
ISSN
1432-1939 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0029-8549
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
179
Numéro
1
Pages
89-101
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Human activities can have a suite of positive and negative effects on animals and thus can affect various life history parameters. Human presence and agricultural practice can be perceived as stressors to which animals react with the secretion of glucocorticoids. The acute short-term secretion of glucocorticoids is considered beneficial and helps an animal to redirect energy and behaviour to cope with a critical situation. However, a long-term increase of glucocorticoids can impair e.g. growth and immune functions. We investigated how nestling barn owls (Tyto alba) are affected by the surrounding landscape and by human activities around their nest sites. We studied these effects on two response levels: (a) the physiological level of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, represented by baseline concentrations of corticosterone and the concentration attained by a standardized stressor; (b) fitness parameters: growth of the nestlings and breeding performance. Nestlings growing up in intensively cultivated areas showed increased baseline corticosterone levels late in the season and had an increased corticosterone release after a stressful event, while their body mass was decreased. Nestlings experiencing frequent anthropogenic disturbance had elevated baseline corticosterone levels, an increased corticosterone stress response and a lower body mass. Finally, breeding performance was better in structurally more diverse landscapes. In conclusion, anthropogenic disturbance affects offspring quality rather than quantity, whereas agricultural practices affect both life history traits.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
05/05/2015 16:19
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:55
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