The abrupt climate change at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and the emergence of South-East Asia triggered the spread of sapindaceous lineages.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_919869C2C307
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The abrupt climate change at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and the emergence of South-East Asia triggered the spread of sapindaceous lineages.
Périodique
Annals of Botany
Auteur(s)
Buerki S., Forest F., Stadler T., Alvarez N.
ISSN
1095-8290 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0305-7364
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
112
Numéro
1
Pages
151-160
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Background and Aims Paleoclimatic data indicate that an abrupt climate change occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene (E-O) boundary affecting the distribution of tropical forests on Earth. The same period has seen the emergence of South-East (SE) Asia, caused by the collision of the Eurasian and Australian plates. How the combination of these climatic and geomorphological factors affected the spatio-temporal history of angiosperms is little known. This topic is investigated by using the worldwide sapindaceous clade as a case study. Methods Analyses of divergence time inference, diversification and biogeography (constrained by paleogeography) are applied to a combined plastid and nuclear DNA sequence data set. Biogeographical and diversification analyses are performed over a set of trees to take phylogenetic and dating uncertainty into account. Results are analysed in the context of past climatic fluctuations. Key Results An increase in the number of dispersal events at the E-O boundary is recorded, which intensified during the Miocene. This pattern is associated with a higher rate in the emergence of new genera. These results are discussed in light of the geomorphological importance of SE Asia, which acted as a tropical bridge allowing multiple contacts between areas and additional speciation across landmasses derived from Laurasia and Gondwana. Conclusions This study demonstrates the importance of the combined effect of geomorphological (the emergence of most islands in SE Asia approx. 30 million years ago) and climatic (the dramatic E-O climate change that shifted the tropical belt and reduced sea levels) factors in shaping species distribution within the sapindaceous clade.
Mots-clé
Biogeography, climate change, diversification, Eocene-Oligocene boundary, Sapindaceae, South-East Asia
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/04/2013 16:08
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:29
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