Impact of age, sex, socioeconomic status, and physical activity on associated movements and motor speed in preschool children.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_90D060DF23E8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Impact of age, sex, socioeconomic status, and physical activity on associated movements and motor speed in preschool children.
Périodique
Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology
Auteur(s)
Kakebeeke T.H., Zysset A.E., Messerli-Bürgy N., Chaouch A., Stülb K., Leeger-Aschmann C.S., Schmutz E.A., Arhab A., Rousson V., Kriemler S., Munsch S., Puder J.J., Jenni O.G.
ISSN
1744-411X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1380-3395
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
40
Numéro
1
Pages
95-106
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Young children generally show contralateral associated movements (CAMs) when they are making an effort to perform a unimanual task. CAM and motor speed are two relevant aspects of motor proficiency in young children. These CAMs decrease over age, while motor speed increases. As both CAM and motor speed are associated with age, we were interested in whether these two parameters are also linked with each other.
In this study, three manual dexterity tasks with the dominant and nondominant hands (pegboard, repetitive hand, and repetitive finger tasks) were used to investigate the effect of covariates (age, sex, socioeconomic status, total physical activity) on both motor speed and CAMs in preschool children.
There was a significant age effect for both motor speed and CAMs in all tasks when the dominant hand was used. When the nondominant hand was used, the decrease in the intensity of CAMs over age was not consistently significant. The influence of physical activity and socioeconomic status on motor proficiency was small. Furthermore, the correlation between motor speed and CAMs, although significant, was low.
Motor speed improved with age over three fine motor tasks in preschool children. Decrease in CAMs was observed but it was not always significant when the nondominant hand was working. Motor speed and CAMs were only weakly associated. We conclude that the excitatory pathways responsible for motor speed and inhibitory pathways responsible for reducing CAMs occupy two different domains in the brain and therefore mostly behave independently of each other.
Mots-clé
Age Factors, Child, Child, Preschool, Exercise, Female, Functional Laterality, Humans, Male, Motor Skills, Psychomotor Performance, Reaction Time, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Contralateral associated movements, SPLASHY, Zurich Neuromotor Assessment, motor speed, preschool
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
30/05/2017 14:19
Dernière modification de la notice
15/04/2019 11:00
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