Constraint and cost of oxidative stress on reproduction: correlative evidence in laboratory mice and review of the literature.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_8EFEB5D68103.P001.pdf (362.53 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_8EFEB5D68103
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Constraint and cost of oxidative stress on reproduction: correlative evidence in laboratory mice and review of the literature.
Périodique
Frontiers in Zoology
Auteur(s)
Stier A., Reichert S., Massemin S., Bize P., Criscuolo F.
ISSN
1742-9994 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1742-9994
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Numéro
1
Pages
37
Langue
anglais
Notes
P.Bize: co-last
Résumé
ABSTRACT:
BACKGROUND: One central concept in evolutionary ecology is that current and residual reproductive values are negatively linked by the so-called cost of reproduction. Previous studies examining the nature of this cost suggested a possible involvement of oxidative stress resulting from the imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidant processes. Still, data remain conflictory probably because, although oxidative damage increases during reproduction, high systemic levels of oxidative stress might also constrain parental investment in reproduction. Here, we investigated variation in oxidative balance (i.e. oxidative damage and antioxidant defences) over the course of reproduction by comparing female laboratory mice rearing or not pups.
RESULTS: A significant increase in oxidative damage over time was only observed in females caring for offspring, whereas antioxidant defences increased over time regardless of reproductive status. Interestingly, oxidative damage measured prior to reproduction was negatively associated with litter size at birth (constraint), whereas damage measured after reproduction was positively related to litter size at weaning (cost).
CONCLUSIONS: Globally, our correlative results and the review of literature describing the links between reproduction and oxidative stress underline the importance of timing/dynamics when studying and interpreting oxidative balance in relation to reproduction. Our study highlights the duality (constraint and cost) of oxidative stress in life-history trade-offs, thus supporting the theory that oxidative stress plays a key role in life-history evolution.
Mots-clé
Life-history trade-offs, Reactive oxygen species, Antioxidant, Ageing, Literature review
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
17/01/2013 17:27
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:20
Données d'usage