From killing lists to healthy country: Aboriginal approaches to weed control in the Kimberley, Western Australia

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Bach et al 2018 JEM authors version.pdf (390.60 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_8D06F1496B8B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
From killing lists to healthy country: Aboriginal approaches to weed control in the Kimberley, Western Australia
Périodique
Journal of environmental management
Auteur(s)
Bach T.M., Kull C.A., Rangan H.
ISSN
1095-8630 (Online)
ISSN-L
0301-4797
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/01/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
229
Pages
182-192
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The Australian Government's funding of land management by Aboriginal communities aims to enable them to manage natural and cultural resources according to their values and aspirations. But this approach is countered in the case of weed management, where the emphasis is on killing plants that are identified on invasive alien species lists prepared by government agencies. Based on field research with Bardi-Jawi, Bunuba, Ngurrara, Nyikina Mangala and Wunggurr land managers in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, we observed that 27 of 35 weed control projects followed the government agency weed lists for species-led control. Of these 27 projects, only two were considered successful in meeting Aboriginal cultural aspirations. In most of the other cases, the list-based approach generated frustration among Aboriginal rangers who felt they were engaged in purposeless killing. In contrast, we found that elders and rangers preferred site-based approaches that considered landscape and vegetation management from their culturally specific and highly contextual geographies of 'healthy country'. We outline instances where ranger groups have adopted site-based management that has been informed by geographies of healthy country and argue that such an approach offers a better alternative to current list-based weed control and produces positive outcomes for Aboriginal communities.
Mots-clé
Aboriginal natural and cultural resource management, Alien invasive species, Australian indigenous communities, Invasion ecology, Site-based management, Traditional ecological knowledge
Pubmed
Création de la notice
06/12/2018 16:33
Dernière modification de la notice
11/04/2019 7:08
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