Physical activity is associated with higher sleep efficiency in the general population: the CoLaus study.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Document(s) secondaire(s)
Télécharger: Sleep_supplementary_Clean.pdf (179.23 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Supplementary document
ID Serval
serval:BIB_8C21CC214DC3
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Physical activity is associated with higher sleep efficiency in the general population: the CoLaus study.
Périodique
Sleep
Auteur(s)
Gubelmann C., Heinzer R., Haba-Rubio J., Vollenweider P., Marques-Vidal P.
ISSN
1550-9109 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0161-8105
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/07/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
41
Numéro
7
Pages
1
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To evaluate the association of objective physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) with sleep duration and quality.
Cross-sectional study including 2649 adults (53.5% women, 45-86 years) from the general population. Proportions of time spent in PA and SB were measured using 14 day accelerometry. Low PA and high SB statuses were defined as the lowest and highest tertile of each behavior. "Inactive," "Weekend warrior," and "Regularly active" weekly patterns were also defined. Sleep parameters were derived from the accelerometer and validated questionnaires.
High PA, relative to low PA, was associated with higher sleep efficiency (76.6 vs. 73.8%, p < 0.01) and lower likelihood of evening chronotype [relative-risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI: 0.71 (0.52; 0.97)]. Similar associations were found for low SB relative to high SB. "Weekend warriors" relative to "Inactives," had higher sleep efficiency [76.4 vs. 73.9%, p < 0.01] and lower likelihood of evening chronotype [RR: 0.63 (0.43; 0.93)]. "Regularly actives," relative to "Inactives," had higher sleep efficiency [76.7 vs. 73.9%, p < 0.01] and tended to have less frequently an evening chronotype [RR: 0.75 (0.54; 1.04), p = 0.09]. No associations were found for PA and SB with sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and risk of sleep apnea (after adjustment for body mass index).
High PA and low SB individuals, even if they do not sleep longer, have higher sleep efficiency and have less frequently an evening chronotype.
Mots-clé
Accelerometry, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Body Mass Index, Cross-Sectional Studies, Exercise/physiology, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Sedentary Behavior, Sleep/physiology, Time Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
12/04/2018 17:20
Dernière modification de la notice
16/04/2019 6:26
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