Association between aortic calcification and total and cardiovascular mortality in older women

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_8BD924C47DC0
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Association between aortic calcification and total and cardiovascular mortality in older women
Périodique
Journal of Internal Medicine
Auteur(s)
Rodondi  N., Taylor  B. C., Bauer  D. C., Lui  L. Y., Vogt  M. T., Fink  H. A., Browner  W. S., Cummings  S. R., Ensrud  K. E.
ISSN
0954-6820 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
261
Numéro
3
Pages
238-44
Notes
Journal Article Multicenter Study Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural --- Old month value: Mar
Résumé
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether older women with abdominal aortic calcification had a greater cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, as such data are limited in older adults. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with a mean follow-up of 13 years. SETTING: Community-based sample with four US clinical centres. SUBJECTS: A total of 2056 women aged > or =65 years with abdominal aortic calcification assessed on baseline radiographs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Mortality rate (all, cardiovascular, cancer or other cause) adjudicated from death certificates and hospital records. RESULTS: The prevalence of abdominal aortic calcification increased with age, ranging from 60% at age 65-69 years to 96% at 85 years and older. Participants with aortic calcification were more likely to die during follow-up of any cause (47% vs. 27%) or a cardiovascular-specific cause (18% vs. 11%, both P < 0.001) than those without aortic calcification. In age-adjusted analyses, aortic calcification was associated with a greater rate of all-cause and cause-specific mortality (cardiovascular, cancer, and other, all P < or = 0.01). In analyses adjusted for age and cardiovascular risk factors, aortic calcification was associated with an increased rate of all-cause mortality (HR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.15-1.64), and noncardiovascular noncancer mortality (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.17-2.11). The associations between aortic calcification and cancer mortality (HR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.00-2.08) or cardiovascular mortality (HR: 1.18, 95% CI: 0.88-1.57) showed a similar pattern without reaching statistical significance, but was slightly stronger for mortality from coronary heart disease (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.91-2.56). CONCLUSIONS: Abdominal aortic calcification in older women is associated with increased mortality. Future research should examine potential mechanisms for this association.
Mots-clé
Age Factors Aged Aged, 80 and over Aortic Diseases/*complications/mortality Calcinosis/complications/*mortality Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology/*mortality Cohort Studies Female Humans Prospective Studies Survival Analysis
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
28/01/2008 13:01
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:12
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