Risk of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in western Switzerland following a tick bite

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_8BB164657E01
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Risk of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in western Switzerland following a tick bite
Périodique
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Auteur(s)
Nahimana  I., Gern  L., Blanc  D. S., Praz  G., Francioli  P., Peter  O.
ISSN
0934-9723
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
08/2004
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Numéro
8
Pages
603-8
Notes
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Aug
Résumé
The aim of this study was to define the risk of developing Lyme borreliosis after a tick bite. A survey was conducted from 1993 to 1995 in the western part of Switzerland in a group of patients who presented for treatment of a recent tick bite. Only patients with negative serological tests (enzyme-linked fluorescent assay screening test, and IgG and IgM immunoblots) at the first consultation and for whom a second blood sample was available 2 months later were included in the study. Of the 376 patients included, 266 had no clinical manifestation (group 1) and 110 had a small local cutaneous reaction (<2 cm) (group 2). The tick was available for 160 patients. Seroconversion was observed in 4.5% of 376 patients, 3.4% in group 1 and 7.2% in group 2. Typical erythema migrans, confirmed by seroconversion, was observed in three of 376 (0.8%) patients, while five of 376 (1.3%) patients developed a skin lesion without seroconversion. No other clinical manifestation of Lyme borreliosis was observed among these 376 patients. Borrelia detection in ticks did not correlate significantly with the risk of Lyme borreliosis. In conclusion, the risk of developing Lyme borreliosis in western Switzerland after a tick bite is low, and therefore, prophylactic antibiotics are not required.
Mots-clé
Adolescent Adult Age Distribution Aged Aged, 80 and over Animals Arachnid Vectors Base Sequence Blotting, Western Borrelia burgdorferi/*isolation & purification Child Child, Preschool DNA, Bacterial/analysis *Endemic Diseases Female Health Surveys Humans Incidence Infant Lyme Disease/diagnosis/*epidemiology Male Middle Aged Molecular Sequence Data Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods Questionnaires Risk Assessment Sex Distribution Switzerland/epidemiology Tick-Borne Diseases/diagnosis/*epidemiology Ticks/microbiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
29/01/2008 16:20
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:12
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