Weight status, body image and bullying among adolescents in the Seychelles.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_8AE703D66926.P001.pdf (291.97 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_8AE703D66926
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Weight status, body image and bullying among adolescents in the Seychelles.
Périodique
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Auteur(s)
Wilson M.L., Viswanathan B., Rousson V., Bovet P.
ISSN
1660-4601 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1660-4601
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Volume
10
Numéro
5
Pages
1763-1774
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
We investigated the relationship between being bullied and measured body weight and perceived body weight among adolescents of a middle-income sub Saharan African country. Our data originated from the Global School-based Health Survey, which targets adolescents aged 13-15 years. Student weights and heights were measured before administrating the questionnaire which included questions about personal data, health behaviors and being bullied. Standard criteria were used to assess thinness, overweight and obesity. Among 1,006 participants who had complete data, 16.5% (95%CI 13.3-20.2) reported being bullied ≥ 3 days during the past 30 days; 13.4% were thin, 16.8% were overweight and 7.6% were obese. Categories of actual weight and of perceived weight correlated only moderately (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.37 for boys and 0.57 for girls; p < 0.001). In univariate analysis, both actual obesity (OR 1.76; p = 0.051) and perception of high weight (OR 1.63 for "slightly overweight"; OR 2.74 for "very overweight", both p < 0.05) were associated with being bullied. In multivariate analysis, ORs for categories of perceived overweight were virtually unchanged while ORs for actual overweight and obesity were substantially attenuated, suggesting a substantial role of perceived weight in the association with being bullied. Actual underweight and perceived thinness also tended to be associated with being bullied, although not significantly. Our findings suggest that more research attention be given to disentangling the significant association between body image, overweight and bullying among adolescents. Further studies in diverse populations are warranted.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
04/07/2013 20:48
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 21:41
Données d'usage