Use of antibiotics within the IMCI guidelines in outpatient settings in Papua New Guinean children: an observational and effectiveness study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_8AB61349846D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Use of antibiotics within the IMCI guidelines in outpatient settings in Papua New Guinean children: an observational and effectiveness study.
Périodique
PLoS One
Auteur(s)
Senn N., Rarau P., Salib M., Manong D., Siba P., Rogerson S., Mueller I., Genton B.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Numéro
3
Pages
e90990
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
INTRODUCTION: There is a need to investigate the effectiveness and appropriateness of antibiotics prescription within the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy in the context of routine outpatient clinics.
METHODS: Making use of a passive case detection system established for a malaria prevention trial in outpatient clinics in Papua New Guinea, the appropriateness and effectiveness of the use of antibiotics within the IMCI was assessed in 1605 young children. Main outcomes were prescription of antibiotics and re-attendances within 14 days for mild pneumonia, mild diarrhoea and uncomplicated malaria whether they were managed with or without antibiotics (proxy of effectiveness). Appropriateness was assessed for both mild and severe cases, while effectiveness was assessed only for mild diseases.
RESULTS: A total of 6975 illness episodes out of 8944 fulfilled inclusion criteria (no previous attendance <14 days+full medical records). Clinical incidence rates (episodes/child/year; 95% CI) were 0.85 (0.81-0.90) for pneumonia, 0.62 (0.58-0.66) for malaria and 0.72 (0.65-0.93) for diarrhoea. Fifty three percent of 6975 sick children were treated with antibiotics, 11% were not treated with antibiotics when they should have been and in 29% antibiotics were prescribed when they should not have been. Re-attendance rates within 14 days following clinical diagnosis of mild pneumonia were 9% (126/1401) when managed with antibiotics compared to 8% (56/701) when managed without (adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) = 1.00 (0.57-1.76), p = 0.98). Rates for mild diarrhoea were 8% (73/874) and 9% (79/866) respectively (aHR = 0.8 (0.42-1.57), p = 0.53).
CONCLUSION: Non-adherence to IMCI recommendations for prescription of antibiotics is common in routine settings in Papua New Guinea. Although recommended, the use of antibiotics in young children with mild pneumonia as defined by IMCI criteria did not impact on their outcome. Better tools and new strategies for the identification of bacterial infections that require antibiotics are urgently needed.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
08/08/2014 17:55
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:10
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