Contribution of in vitro neurotoxicology studies to the elucidation of neurodegenerative processes.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_88160209025E
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Contribution of in vitro neurotoxicology studies to the elucidation of neurodegenerative processes.
Périodique
Brain Research Bulletin
Auteur(s)
Zurich M.G., Monnet-Tschudi F.
ISSN
1873-2747[electronic], 0361-9230[linking]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Volume
80
Numéro
4-5
Pages
211-216
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Only a small percentage of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease is directly related to familial forms. The etiology of the most abundant, sporadic forms seems to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Environmental compounds are now extensively studied for their possible contribution to neurodegeneration. Chemicals were found which were able to reproduce symptoms of known neurodegenerative diseases, others may either predispose to the onset of neurodegeneration, or exacerbate distinct pathogenic processes of these diseases. In any case, in vitro studies performed with models presenting various degrees of complexity have shown that many environmental compounds have the potential to cause neurodegeneration, through a variety of pathways similar to those described in neurodegenerative diseases. Since the population is exposed to a huge number of potentially neurotoxic compounds, there is an important need for rapid and efficient procedures for hazard evaluation. Xenobiotics elicit a cascade of reactions that, most of the time, involve numerous interactions between the different brain cell types. A reliable in vitro model for the detection of environmental toxins potentially at risk for neurodegenerative diseases should therefore allow maximal cell-cell interactions and multiparametric endpoints determination. The combined use of in vitro models and new analytical approaches using "omics" technologies should help to map toxicity pathways, and advance our understanding of the possible role of xenobiotics in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases.
Mots-clé
Animals, Brain/pathology, Environmental Exposure, Hazardous Substances/toxicity, Humans, Neurodegenerative Diseases/etiology, Neurotoxins/toxicity, Risk Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
10/10/2009 22:16
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:03
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