The effect of dietary antioxidant supplementation in a vertebrate host on the infection dynamics and transmission of avian malaria to the vector.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_876802DAC744
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The effect of dietary antioxidant supplementation in a vertebrate host on the infection dynamics and transmission of avian malaria to the vector.
Périodique
Parasitology research
Auteur(s)
Delhaye J., Glaizot O., Christe P.
ISSN
1432-1955 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0932-0113
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
07/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
117
Numéro
7
Pages
2043-2052
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Host susceptibility to parasites is likely to be influenced by intrinsic factors, such as host oxidative status determined by the balance between pro-oxidant production and antioxidant defences. As a result, host oxidative status acts as an environmental factor for parasites and may constrain parasite development. We evaluated the role of host oxidative status on infection dynamics of an avian malarial parasite by providing canaries (Serinus canaria) with an antioxidant supplementation composed of vitamin E (a lipophilic antioxidant) and olive oil, a source of monounsaturated fatty acids. Another group received a standard, non-supplemented food. Half of the birds in each group where then infected with the haemosporidian parasite, Plasmodium relictum. We monitored the parasitaemia, haematocrit level, and red cell membrane resistance, as well as the transmission success of the parasite to its mosquito vector, Culex pipiens. During the acute phase, the negative effect of the infection was more severe in the supplemented group, as shown by a lower haematocrit level. Parasitaemia was lower in the supplemented group during the chronic phase only. Mosquitoes fed on supplemented hosts were more often infected than mosquitoes fed on the control group. These results suggest that dietary antioxidant supplementation conferred protection against Plasmodium in the long term, at the expense of a short-term negative effect. Malaria parasites may take advantage of antioxidants, as shown by the increased transmission rate in the supplemented group. Overall, our results suggest an important role of oxidative status in infection outcome and parasite transmission.
Mots-clé
Animals, Antioxidants/metabolism, Canaries/metabolism, Canaries/parasitology, Culex/parasitology, Culex/physiology, Feeding Behavior, Female, Malaria, Avian/metabolism, Malaria, Avian/parasitology, Malaria, Avian/transmission, Male, Mosquito Vectors/parasitology, Mosquito Vectors/physiology, Olive Oil/metabolism, Oxidative Stress, Parasitemia/parasitology, Parasitemia/transmission, Parasitemia/veterinary, Plasmodium/physiology, Vitamin E/metabolism, Culex pipiens, Haemosporidian, Oxidative status, Plasmodium relictum, Serinus canaria
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
09/07/2018 17:32
Dernière modification de la notice
28/05/2019 6:11
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