The Impact of Infection on Chronic Allograft Dysfunction and Allograft Survival After Solid Organ Transplantation.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_8710031D5CD8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The Impact of Infection on Chronic Allograft Dysfunction and Allograft Survival After Solid Organ Transplantation.
Périodique
American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
Auteur(s)
Martin-Gandul C., Mueller N.J., Pascual M., Manuel O.
ISSN
1600-6143 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1600-6135
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Volume
15
Numéro
12
Pages
3024-3040
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Infectious diseases after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are a significant cause of morbidity and reduced allograft and patient survival; however, the influence of infection on the development of chronic allograft dysfunction has not been completely delineated. Some viral infections appear to affect allograft function by both inducing direct tissue damage and immunologically related injury, including acute rejection. In particular, this has been observed for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in all SOT recipients and for BK virus infection in kidney transplant recipients, for community-acquired respiratory viruses in lung transplant recipients, and for hepatitis C virus in liver transplant recipients. The impact of bacterial and fungal infections is less clear, but bacterial urinary tract infections and respiratory tract colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus spp appear to be correlated with higher rates of chronic allograft dysfunction in kidney and lung transplant recipients, respectively. Evidence supports the beneficial effects of the use of antiviral prophylaxis for CMV in improving allograft function and survival in SOT recipients. Nevertheless, there is still a need for prospective interventional trials assessing the potential effects of preventive and therapeutic strategies against bacterial and fungal infection for reducing or delaying the development of chronic allograft dysfunction.
Mots-clé
Allografts, Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use, Graft Rejection/etiology, Graft Rejection/prevention & control, Graft Survival, Humans, Infection/complications, Infection/physiopathology, Organ Transplantation/adverse effects, Prognosis
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
27/11/2015 13:03
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:46
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