Egocentric and object-based transformations in the laterality judgement of human and animal faces and of non-corporeal objects.

Détails

Ressource 1Demande d'une copieEtat: Supprimée
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_86F004FE03CF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Egocentric and object-based transformations in the laterality judgement of human and animal faces and of non-corporeal objects.
Périodique
Behavioural Brain Research
Auteur(s)
Ionta S., Fourkas A.D., Aglioti S.M.
ISSN
1872-7549 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0166-4328
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
207
Numéro
2
Pages
452-457
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Mental rotation of body parts is influenced by specific sensory-motor information, and may be performed using an egocentric (subject-based) or an object-based mental transformation. Neurologically healthy volunteers were asked to verbally judge the laterality of visually presented human face, owl face and front of a car with a black patch over one eye/headlight, presented in one of eight orientations. Subjects may or may not have their head held in a head brace. The transformation used to solve the task was assessed with a questionnaire. Response times were non-monotonical at 180 degrees for the object-based group, but not for the group using egocentric transformation. Having head movement constrained by the use of a head brace ("fixed") or not ("moving") did not influence performance. Within the two groups, no differences were found between the three types of stimuli. Hence, the response profile for mental rotation of human faces and face-like stimuli depended on the type of mental spatial transformation used to solve the task, independently from the possibility to move the head and from the kind of stimuli processed.
Mots-clé
Adult, Animals, Face, Female, Head Movements, Humans, Judgment, Male, Mental Processes, Photic Stimulation, Psychophysics, Questionnaires, Reaction Time, Rotation, Space Perception, Strigiformes, Task Performance and Analysis, Visual Perception, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
04/02/2015 11:10
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:00
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