Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma as a cause of pituitary dysfunction.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_837B2624587A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma as a cause of pituitary dysfunction.
Périodique
Neurosurgical Focus
Auteur(s)
Dubourg J., Messerer M.
ISSN
1092-0684 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1092-0684
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Volume
31
Numéro
5
Pages
E2
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is recognized as a cause of hypopituitarism even after mild TBI. Although over the past decade, a growing body of research has detailed neuroendocrine changes induced by TBI, the mechanisms and risk factors responsible for this pituitary dysfunction are still unclear. Around the world, sports-especially combative sports-are very popular. However, sports are not generally considered as a cause of TBI in most epidemiological studies, and the link between sports-related head trauma and hypopituitarism has not been investigated until recently. Thus, there is a paucity of data regarding this important concern. Because of the large number of young sports participants with near-normal life expectancy, the implications of undiagnosed or untreated postconcussion pituitary dysfunction can be dramatic. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms and risk factors of hypopituitarism caused by sports injuries is thus an important issue that concerns both medical staff and sponsors of sports. The aim of this paper was to summarize the best evidence for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms and to discuss the current data and recommendations on sports-related head trauma as a cause of hypopituitarism.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
08/12/2011 12:43
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:52
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