Category-specific cortical mapping: color-naming areas.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_82927EC4493C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Category-specific cortical mapping: color-naming areas.
Périodique
Journal of Neurosurgery
Auteur(s)
Roux F.E., Lubrano V., Lauwers-Cances V., Mascott C.R., Démonet J.F.
ISSN
0022-3085 (Print)
ISSN-L
0022-3085
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2006
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
104
Numéro
1
Pages
27-37
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECT: It has been hypothesized that a certain degree of specialization exists within language areas, depending on some specific lexical repertories or categories. To spare hypothetical category-specific cortical areas and to gain a better understanding of their organization, the authors studied patients who had undergone electrical stimulation mapping for brain tumors and they compared an object-naming task with a category-specific task (color naming).
METHODS: Thirty-six patients with no significant preoperative language deficit were prospectively studied during a 2-year period. Along with a reading task, both object- and color-naming tasks were used in brain mapping. During color naming, patients were asked to identify 11 visually presented basic colors. The modality specificity of the color-naming sites found was subsequently tested by asking patients to retrieve the color attributes of objects. High individual variability was observed in language organization among patients and in the tasks performed. Significant interferences in color naming were found in traditional language regions-that is, Broca (p < 0.003) and Wernicke centers (p = 0.05)--although some color-naming areas were occasionally situated outside of these regions. Color-naming interferences were exclusively localized in small cortical areas (< 1 cm2). Anatomical segregation of the different naming categories was apparent in 10 patients; in all, 13 color-specific naming areas (that is, sites evoking no object-naming interference) were detected in the dominant-hemisphere F3 and the supramarginal, angular, and posterior parts of the temporal gyri. Nevertheless, no specific brain region was found to be consistently involved in color naming (p > 0.05). At five sites, although visually presented color-naming tasks were impaired by stimulation, auditory color naming (for example, "What color is grass?") was performed with no difficulty, showing that modality-specific areas can be found during naming.
CONCLUSIONS: Within language areas, a relative specialization of cortical language areas for color naming can be found during electrical stimulation mapping.
Mots-clé
Adult, Aged, Brain Mapping, Brain Neoplasms/complications, Brain Neoplasms/surgery, Cerebral Cortex/physiology, Color Perception, Electric Stimulation, Female, Frontal Lobe/physiology, Humans, Language, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Reading, Temporal Lobe/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 19:50
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:50
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