Twitch mouth pressure for detecting respiratory muscle weakness in suspicion of neuromuscular disorder.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_820F6687BC25
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Twitch mouth pressure for detecting respiratory muscle weakness in suspicion of neuromuscular disorder.
Périodique
Neuromuscular disorders
Auteur(s)
Santos D.B., Desmarais G., Falaize L., Ogna A., Cognet S., Louis B., Orlikowski D., Prigent H., Lofaso F.
ISSN
1873-2364 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0960-8966
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
06/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Numéro
6
Pages
518-525
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Twitch mouth pressure using magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves and an automated inspiratory trigger is a noninvasive, non-volitional assessment of diaphragmatic strength. Our aims were to validate this method in patients with suspected neuromuscular disease, to determine the best inspiratory-trigger pressure threshold, and to evaluate whether twitch mouth pressure decreased the overdiagnosis of muscle weakness frequently observed with noninvasive volitional tests. Maximal inspiratory pressure, sniff nasal pressure, and twitch mouth pressure were measured in 112 patients with restrictive disease and suspected neuromuscular disorder. Esophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures were measured in 64 of these patients to confirm or infirm inspiratory muscle weakness. Magnetic stimulation was triggered by inspiratory pressures of -1 and -5 cmH2O. The -5 cmH2O trigger produced the best correlation between twitch mouth pressure and twitch esophageal pressure (R(2) = 0.86; P <0.0001). The best association of noninvasive tests to predict inspiratory muscle weakness was sniff nasal pressure and twitch mouth pressure. Below-normal maximal inspiratory pressure and sniff nasal pressure values suggesting inspiratory muscle weakness were found in 63/112 patients. Only 52 of these 63 patients also had abnormal twitch mouth pressure. In conclusion twitch mouth pressure measurement is a simple, noninvasive, nonvolitional technique which may help to select patients with suspected neuromuscular disorder for invasive inspiratory-muscle investigation.

Mots-clé
Magnetic stimulation, Neuromuscular diseases, Respiratory muscle strength, Twitch mouth pressure
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
26/08/2017 21:43
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:49
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