Is ventricular fibrillation the most common initial rhythm in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_814C24788EC2
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Poster: résume de manière illustrée et sur une page unique les résultats d'un projet de recherche. Les résumés de poster doivent être entrés sous "Abstract" et non "Poster".
Collection
Publications
Titre
Is ventricular fibrillation the most common initial rhythm in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?
Titre de la conférence
Resuscitation 2004, 7th Congress of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC)
Auteur(s)
Katz E., Metzger J., Schlaepfer J., Fromer M., Fishman R., Kehtari R., Mayer L., Kappenberger L.
Adresse
Budapest, Hungary, September 8-11
ISBN
0300-9572
ISSN-L
0300-9572
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2004
Volume
62
Série
Resuscitation
Pages
403
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Background: Historical data based on Emergency Medical
Services (EMS) observations estimated ventricular fibrillation
(VF) to be the most common initial rhythm in out-ofhospital
cardiac arrest (OHCA).However recent observations
also based on analysis of EMS data reported a decreasing
incidence of out-of-hospital VF. The aim of our study was
to determine the incidence of out-of-hospital VF in French
speaking part of Switzerland. Methods: A retrospective analysis
of EMS registers in the French speaking part of Switzerland
(population 1.5 million inhabitants) collected details of
OHCA during major sporting events in 1998, 2001 and 2002.
Only adult non-traumatic OHCA were selected for our study.
Results:We identified 190 patients who suffered fromOHCA
during study period. Most patients were males 115 (60%).
The mean age (S.D.) was 65 (15) years; 130 OHCA (68%)
occured at home. Despite a mean response time (S.D.) of 7.9
(1.2) min only 38 (20%) patients were found in VF on arrival
of the EMS. In 127 (67%) patients asystole was the first
recorded "rhythm" and in 25 (13%) patients pulseless electrical
activity was recorded. Conclusions: The low incidence of
out-of-hospital VF in our study cannot be explained only by
EMS response time, which is longer in comparison with historical
data but still comparable to most recent reports. One
of the possible explanations is the increased time interval between
collapse and the call for help reducing the likelihood of
finding the patient in VF by EMS crew. Aggressive primary
and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (including
widespread use of b-blocking agents) can also contribute
to our findings.
Création de la notice
28/01/2008 11:09
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:47
Données d'usage