The gut microbiota of insects - diversity in structure and function.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_7F3CA896D65A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The gut microbiota of insects - diversity in structure and function.
Périodique
FEMS Microbiology Reviews
Auteur(s)
Engel P., Moran N.A.
ISSN
1574-6976 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0168-6445
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Volume
37
Numéro
5
Pages
699-735
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Insect guts present distinctive environments for microbial colonization, and bacteria in the gut potentially provide many beneficial services to their hosts. Insects display a wide range in degree of dependence on gut bacteria for basic functions. Most insect guts contain relatively few microbial species as compared to mammalian guts, but some insects harbor large gut communities of specialized bacteria. Others are colonized only opportunistically and sparsely by bacteria common in other environments. Insect digestive tracts vary extensively in morphology and physicochemical properties, factors that greatly influence microbial community structure. One obstacle to the evolution of intimate associations with gut microorganisms is the lack of dependable transmission routes between host individuals. Here, social insects, such as termites, ants, and bees, are exceptions: social interactions provide opportunities for transfer of gut bacteria, and some of the most distinctive and consistent gut communities, with specialized beneficial functions in nutrition and protection, have been found in social insect species. Still, gut bacteria of other insects have also been shown to contribute to nutrition, protection from parasites and pathogens, modulation of immune responses, and communication. The extent of these roles is still unclear and awaits further studies.
Mots-clé
bacterial diversity, digestive system, gut communities, immune system, symbiosis, mutualism
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
16/01/2014 17:48
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:43
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