Sudden weather deterioration but not brood size affects baseline corticosterone levels in nestling Alpine swifts.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_7ECC01F29C15.P001.pdf (584.23 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_7ECC01F29C15
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Sudden weather deterioration but not brood size affects baseline corticosterone levels in nestling Alpine swifts.
Périodique
Hormones and Behavior
Auteur(s)
Bize P., Stocker A., Jenni-Eiermann S., Gasparini J., Roulin A.
ISSN
1095-6867[electronic], 0018-506X[linking]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
58
Numéro
4
Pages
591-598
Langue
anglais
Résumé
While evidence is accumulating that stress-induced glucocorticoid responses help organisms to quickly adjust their physiology and behaviour to life-threatening environmental perturbations, the function and the ecological factors inducing variation in baseline glucocorticoid levels remain poorly understood. In this study we investigated the effects of brood size by experimentally manipulating the number of nestlings per brood and the effect of weather condition on baseline corticosterone levels of nestling Alpine swifts (Apus melba). We also examined the potential negative consequences of an elevation of baseline corticosterone on nestling immunity by correlating corticosterone levels with ectoparasite intensity and the antibody production towards a vaccine. Although nestlings reared in enlarged broods were in poorer condition than nestlings reared in reduced broods, they showed similar baseline corticosterone levels. In contrast, nestling baseline corticosterone levels were higher immediately after cold and rainy episodes with strong winds. Neither nestling infestation rate by ectoparastic flies nor nestling antibody production against a vaccine was correlated with baseline corticosterone levels. Thus, our results suggest that altricial Alpine swift nestlings can quickly modulate baseline corticosterone levels in response to unpredictable variations in meteorological perturbation but not to brood size which may be associated with the degree of sibling competition. Apparently, short-term elevations of baseline corticosterone have no negative effects on nestling immunocompetence.
Mots-clé
Acclimatization/physiology, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Birds/blood, Birds/physiology, Clutch Size/physiology, Corticosterone/analysis, Corticosterone/blood, Nesting Behavior/physiology, Sibling Relations, Stress, Psychological/blood, Weather
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
10/08/2010 10:14
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:42
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