Social-Life - the Paradox of Multiple-Queen Colonies

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_7E592AFEF35D.P001.pdf (874.53 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_7E592AFEF35D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Social-Life - the Paradox of Multiple-Queen Colonies
Périodique
Trends in Ecology & Evolution
Auteur(s)
Keller  L.
ISSN
0169-5347
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/1995
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
10
Numéro
9
Pages
355-360
Notes
Rp105 Times Cited:108 Cited References Count:73 --- Old month value: Sep
Résumé
The evolution of animal societies in which some individuals forego their own reproductive opportunities to help others to reproduce poses an evolutionary paradox that can be traced to Darwin. Altruism may evolve through kin selection when the donor and recipient of altruistic acts are related to each other, as generally is the case in social birds and mammals. Similarly, social insect workers are highly related to the brood they rear when colonies are headed by a single queen. However, recent studies have shown that insect colonies frequently contain several queens, with the effect of decreasing relatedness among colony members. How can one account for the origin and maintenance of such colonies? This evolutionary enigma presents many of the same theoretical challenges as does the evolution of cooperative breeding and eusociality.
Mots-clé
ant solenopsis-invicta genetic population-structure iridomyrmex-humilis mayr leptothorax-longispinosus reproductive success eusocial hymenoptera evolution formicidae relatedness number
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 19:40
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 20:59
Données d'usage