Community response to intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi) in Papua New Guinea.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 21176197_BIB_7E498929E4E5.pdf (239.24 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_7E498929E4E5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Community response to intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi) in Papua New Guinea.
Périodique
Malaria journal
Auteur(s)
Pell C., Straus L., Phuanukoonnon S., Lupiwa S., Mueller I., Senn N., Siba P., Gysels M., Pool R.
ISSN
1475-2875 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1475-2875
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
22/12/2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Pages
369
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Building on previous acceptability research undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa this article aims to investigate the acceptability of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi) in Papua New Guinea (PNG).
A questionnaire was administered to mothers whose infants participated in the randomised placebo controlled trial of IPTi. Mothers whose infants participated and who refused to participate in the trial, health workers, community reporters and opinion leaders were interviewed. Men and women from the local community also participated in focus group discussions.
Respondents viewed IPTi as acceptable in light of wider concern for infant health and the advantages of trial participation. Mothers reported complying with at-home administration of IPTi due to perceived benefits of IPTi and pressure from health workers. In spite of patchy knowledge, respondents also demonstrated a demand for infant vaccinations and considered non-vaccination to be neglect. There is little evidence that IPTi has negative impacts on attitudes to EPI, EPI adherence or existing malaria prevention practices.
The degree of similarity between findings from the acceptability studies undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa and PNG allows some generalization relating to the implementation of IPTi outside of Africa: IPTi fits well with local health cultures, appears to be accepted easily and has little impact on attitudes towards EPI or malaria prevention. The study adds to the evidence indicating that IPTi could be rolled out in a range of social and cultural contexts.

Mots-clé
Antimalarials/administration & dosage, Chemoprevention/methods, Female, Humans, Infant, Interviews as Topic, Malaria/prevention & control, Male, Papua New Guinea, Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data, Placebos/administration & dosage, Surveys and Questionnaires
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
15/12/2016 14:12
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 20:59
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