How to identify and recruit nurses to a survey 14 and 24 years after graduation in a context of scarce data: lessons learnt from the 2012 nurses at work pilot study on nurses' career paths.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_7B9BD9CF1935.P001.pdf (687.31 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_7B9BD9CF1935
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
How to identify and recruit nurses to a survey 14 and 24 years after graduation in a context of scarce data: lessons learnt from the 2012 nurses at work pilot study on nurses' career paths.
Périodique
Bmc Health Services Research
Auteur(s)
Addor V., Jeannin A., Morin D., Lehmann P., Jeanneret F.R., Schwendimann R.
ISSN
1472-6963 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1472-6963
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
15
Numéro
120
Pages
120
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Nursing workforce data are scarce in Switzerland, with no active national registry of nurses. The worldwide nursing shortage is also affecting Switzerland, so that evidence-based results of the nurses at work project on career paths and retention are needed as part of the health care system stewardship; nurses at work is a retrospective cohort study of nurses who graduated in Swiss nursing schools in the last 30 years. Results of the pilot study are presented here (process and feasibility). The objectives are (1) to determine the size and structure of the potential target population by approaching two test-cohorts of nursing graduates (1988 and 1998); (2) to test methods of identifying and reaching them 14 and 24 years after graduation; (3) to compute participation rates, and identify recruitment and participation biases.
METHODS: Graduates' names were retrieved from 26 Swiss nursing schools: 488 nurses from the 1988 cohort and 597 from 1998 were invited to complete a web-based questionnaire. Initial updated addresses (n = 278, seed sample) were found using the Swiss Nursing Association member file. In addition, a snowball method was applied for recruitment, where directly-contacted respondents provided additional names of graduate mates or sent them the invitation. The study was further advertized through the main employers, study partners, and a press release.
RESULTS: Participation rate was 26.5% (n = 287), higher for the older cohort of 1988 (29.7%, n = 145) than for 1998 (15.6%, n = 93). Additional nurses (n = 363) not belonging to the test cohorts also answered. All schools were represented among respondents. Only 18 respondents (6%) worked outside nursing or not at all. Among respondents, 94% would 'probably' or 'maybe' agree to participate in the main study.
CONCLUSION: The pilot study demonstrated that targeted nurses could be identified and approached. There is an overwhelming interest in the project from them and from policymakers. Recommendations to increase nurses' participation rate for nurses at work include: (1) to open nurses at work recruitment to all nurses in Switzerland, while recreating cohorts post-hoc for relevant analysis; (2) to define a comprehensive communication strategy with special attention to graduate nurses who are harder to reach.
Mots-clé
Adult, Cohort Studies, Female, Health Manpower/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nursing Staff/statistics & numerical data, Personnel Selection/methods, Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data, Pilot Projects, Retrospective Studies, Surveys and Questionnaires, Switzerland, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
31/03/2015 23:16
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:35
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