Training in flexible intensive insulin therapy improves quality of life, decreases the risk of hypoglycaemia and ameliorates poor metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_7A485F0E93D3
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Training in flexible intensive insulin therapy improves quality of life, decreases the risk of hypoglycaemia and ameliorates poor metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes.
Périodique
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Auteur(s)
Bendik C.F., Keller U., Moriconi N., Gessler A., Schindler C.h., Zulewski H., Ruiz J., Puder J.J.
ISSN
1872-8227
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
83
Numéro
3
Pages
327-333
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
AIM: Intensified insulin therapy has evolved to be the standard treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, it has been reported to increase significantly the risk of hypoglycaemia. We studied the effect of structured group teaching courses in flexible insulin therapy (FIT) on psychological and metabolic parameters in patients with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: We prospectively followed 45 type 1 diabetic patients of our outpatient clinic participating in 5 consecutive FIT teaching courses at the University Hospital of Basel. These courses consist of 7 weekly ambulatory evening group sessions. Patients were studied before and 1, 6, and 18 months after the course. Main outcome measures were glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), severe hypoglycaemic events, quality of life (DQoL), diabetes self-control (IPC-9) and diabetes knowledge (DWT). RESULTS: Quality of life, self-control and diabetes knowledge improved after the FIT courses (all p<0.001). The frequency of severe hypoglycaemic events decreased ten-fold from 0.33 episodes/6 months at baseline to 0.03 episodes/6 months after 18 months (p<0.05). Baseline HbA1c was 7.2+/-1.1% and decreased in the subgroup with HbA1c > or = 8% from 8.4% to 7.8% (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In an unselected, but relatively well-controlled population of type 1 diabetes, a structured, but not very time consuming FIT teaching programme in the outpatient setting improves psychological well-being and metabolic parameters.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
13/03/2009 12:21
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:33
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